A Good Job Goes Both Ways in Customer Service

a good job goes both ways in customer service.

When we interview a customer in as part of our ServiceConnect process and the customer calls out an individual or department for exemplary customer service, it gets flagged as a "Good Job."  An email gets sent to the client to bring awareness to the employee's performance.  We know from client feedback that employees love the recognition, especially since it is unsolicited. 

What we had not paid as much attention to is how just much difference there was between how customers with Good Job flags rated their experiences versus those who did not.  Just two examples:

--Depending on the market, the NPS (Net Promoter Score) was 8 to 12 points higher for those customers who offered a Good Job commendation versus those who did not.

--While NPS is a willingness to refer we want to know if they have actually referred a client company in the past six months.  Those customers with a Good Job were significantly more likely to refer than those without.

--We ask a series of questions about the specifics of the customer service experience and the customers' satisfaction with it.  On all questions, the ratings were higher and in some cases, significantly higher for customers that called out an employee for making it a great customer service experience.

What does this tell us?  In the business-to-business markets in which we work, individual employees have an opportunity to greatly influence for better or worse, the customer service experience.  Obviously, employees who are willing to deliver that little extra is dependent on hiring the right employees in the first place and then creating an environment that recognizes employees for this extra effort.  More will be coming on hiring the right kinds of employees and creating the right environment.  From our research, we know that customers will respond positively if treated with that "little something extra."  Interestingly, in most cases, that little something extra in the customer service experience doesn't cost anything extra!

Lynn Daniel

Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score, and NPS are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Inc., Bain & Company, Inc., and Fred Reichheld.

SHARE

    

Join our Newsletter

RECENT